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From the manufacturer:

Trailer Aid Plus is the fast, safe and easy way to change a trailer tire on a tandem wheeled trailer. You pull the good tire up onto Trailer Aid Plus to raise the flat tire up 5.5" for changing. Trailer Aid Plus has an additional 1" lift more than the original Trailer Aid and is perfect for RV trailers and horse trailers. It is great for horse trailers so you do not have to remove your horses in order to change a flat tire. The extra 1" lift is handy when performing routine maintenance on the trailer. Lifetime guarantee.

My experience:

I have not had to use this to change a flat tire (And hopefully I never will) but I keep it with me just in case.  I have used it to grease the bearings and it was very easy to use.  It’s light weight, made of very strong plastic and stores easily.  It seems to be a much more practical option than a jack and gives me piece of mind knowing that I could easily change a tire on the side of the road if necessary.

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Last edited by Eric Dye
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I've not had to change a flat on the road either, but I've learned that it is difficult to get a jack under the Lance at the jack pads. Not something I'd like to do on the road. 

Gary - PAU HANA - carries two of these in his truck.  He has a well documented long trip on this forum with significant tire problems.  After talking to Gary at Shingletown, I decided this was a must have for us. Found it on Amazon for about $54.00 and no shipping on Prime. Comes in a nice, very useful box that I'm going to use for travel. 

Last edited by Mike and Sue

From experience; Changing flats, and replacing 2 tires on the same axle (using 2 Trailer Aids). Easy Peasy..no trying to get a jack under your TT.
As of now I can't think of a reason to use a jack to ever change tires.

EDIT: No finesse required without a spotter. Just look at your rear view mirror or just "feel" the trailer, which I do...

Last edited by pau hana

I've had one of these on the trailer for years and finally had to put it to use this past summer. We had a blow out on hwy 84 and had to pull over on the side of the freeway. The shoulder was sloped at a pretty good angle and the semis whizzing by at 80 mph shook the trailer every time they passed by. If all I had to depend on was some sort of bottle jack, I'm pretty sure it would have become dislodged when one of those trucks whizzed by.

The Trailer Aid is an invaluable tool for emergencies.

Here's the thread I started describing our mishap.

https://community.lanceowners.org/topic/tpms-saved-the-day

pau hana posted:

From experience; Changing flats, and replacing 2 tires on the same axle (using 2 Trailer Aids). Easy Peasy..no trying to get a jack under your TT.
As of now I can't think of a reason to use a jack to ever change tires.

EDIT: No finesse required without a spotter. Just look at your rear view mirror or just "feel" the trailer, which I do...

I know our axles are pretty close together.. Does it matter which one we get? the regular Trailer-Aid or the Plus? I  just want to make sure there is no interference..

Joe

Last edited by PoconoJoe

  Bought the plus for our fifthwheel, but we bought the truck camper right after. So I gave the plus to my nephew, he took his family across country to Alabama to visit other family members. His tires must have been old because he had numerous blowouts. He replaced all his tires, but he called me and thanked me for the plus, it worked great changing tires on his fifthwheel, while on the side of the freeway.

  If I had a trailer with tandem axles, I would not leave home without it! Here I'll put my name on this one, Garnet! I think it is a great product!

PoconoJoe posted:
pau hana posted:

From experience; Changing flats, and replacing 2 tires on the same axle (using 2 Trailer Aids). Easy Peasy..no trying to get a jack under your TT.
As of now I can't think of a reason to use a jack to ever change tires.

EDIT: No finesse required without a spotter. Just look at your rear view mirror or just "feel" the trailer, which I do...

I know our axles are pretty close together.. Does it matter which one we get? the regular Trailer-Aid or the Plus? I  just want to make sure there is no interference..

Joe

Doesn't matter which one. They're both the same length, the plus is 1" higher.
Either one will work as I have used both, which I have.

PoconoJoe posted:
pau hana posted:

From experience; Changing flats, and replacing 2 tires on the same axle (using 2 Trailer Aids). Easy Peasy..no trying to get a jack under your TT.
As of now I can't think of a reason to use a jack to ever change tires.

EDIT: No finesse required without a spotter. Just look at your rear view mirror or just "feel" the trailer, which I do...

I know our axles are pretty close together.. Does it matter which one we get? the regular Trailer-Aid or the Plus? I  just want to make sure there is no interference..

Joe

The length doesn't interfere with the other axle if you place it so that you drive forward onto it if you want the front wheel on it (rear tire flat), and place it to drive backwards onto it if you want the rear wheel on it (front tire flat).  

Perhaps I'm missing something since I haven't yet experienced a trailer flat, but for those of us who carry a set or two of lynx levelers, wouldn't those serve the same purpose of lifting the trailer in order to change a flat? I realize they may not be quite as easy to use as a trailer aid, but do I really have to purchase (and carry) a separate lift just for flats?

Image result for lynx levelers flat tire



Last edited by Eric Dye
Brubie posted:

Perhaps I'm missing something since I haven't yet experienced a trailer flat, but for those of us who carry a set or two of lynx levelers, wouldn't those serve the same purpose of lifting the trailer in order to change a flat? I realize they may not be quite as easy to use as a trailer aid, but do I really have to purchase (and carry) a separate lift just for flats?

Image result for lynx levelers flat tire

I was thinking the same thing when I first saw a trailer aid. But I think the  concave rise is designed to give room for the other tire. Using the blocks creates a square/straight rise and the other tire might touch, especially as close as our tires ride on our Lances. I have to use 4 blocks high to level my trailer in my driveway, and when I back on them, the front tire drops down and touches the blocks, as the back tire is rising because of the independent suspension. But then maybe if you made the blocks short and steep they would work. But they might slide on the pavement also. The trailer aid has a base that grips the pavement.

They work well. I have used mine to replace brakes,bearings ect. on my 34' gooseneck trailer. Luckily have not had to use it on the road yet!

Update: Should have never said that I have not used on the road yet!

Changed a flat tire on my gooseneck trailer in 102 Degree Heat last summer just 40 miles into a 2200 mile trip. Trailer scaled at 14K on double axle trailer and trailer aid worked flawlessly.!!

Last edited by cjs

I have the regular Trailer Aid. I also use a 1/2 inch Baltic Birch plywood doohickey I fabricated so it won't sink into my decomposed granite (gravel) parking pad. The Trailer Aid works for tire changes, brake work and greasing bearings.

DIY wooden ramps work but are heavy if you plan to carry it in your rig. The Trailer Aid is light weight and can be carried anywhere, even in your slideout.

What, you don't know what Baltic Birch is? It's plywood made with no voids between the layers of wood. I used it for cabinet making and had some scraps left over. Don't go out and buy it if you don't have it. Expensive.

I might go back to a single axle trailer in the future. In that case the Trailer Aid won't work for tire changes. Does anyone have a recommendation for that situation?

I had TPMS sensors installed in my 2285 and not wanting to try and get the trailer into the shops small lot from a busy road I pulled off tires and drove them down, yeah took 2 trips.

Anyway, I used the lego plastic leveling blocks to build the ramp to get the tireoff the ground, worked fine vs spending another $49 for the Trailer Aide. Less money spent and less to carry when on the road. The lego blocks always go where the trailer goes. Being a dual axle I carry 2 sets because when I level the trailer I build for both tires, not just one.

Last edited by Eric Dye

I just used my "Trailer Aid" to grease my axles on my 2285.  Worked perfectly.  I like the dip to hold the lifting tire in place.  Safety is a primary concern for me and this seems to fit the bill.  It is light weight and stores easily in the closet in our 2285.  So much easier and safer than a jack.

Well, thanks to Havabrew22 I purchased this for our Lance. 400 miles into our first trip with our new Lance we picked up a nail and as we were pulling into our site watched the tire go completely flat. This ramp along with my 12v impact made the tire change a ten minute job. Sadly the Goodyear Endurance Tire was kaput from a 1 inch finishing nail that entered too close to the tread crown to be repaired. This is an easy peasy tool that has a permanent spot on the Lance. I had considered booting the inpact  because it’s like 15lbs. It’s spot is secure for now too!

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